PhotoHunter: “Rock”

My “rock” is part of the Canadian Shield. The Canadian Shield (aka the Precambrian Shield, or Laurentian Shield) is the Precambrian rock that covers about 8 million square kilometers of Eastern and Central Canada. It is comprised of some of the world’s oldest rock, dating back approximately 4.5 billion and 540 million years.

Some of that Pre-Cambrian rock.

Some of that Precambrian rock.

Over successive ice ages, mountains (including some volcanic) as high and awesome as the Rockies have been scoured down to bare rock over which lies boreal forest. You can find evidence of the last ice age all over the place.

The view of the Laurentian mountains from Mont Tremblant, Quebec

The view of the Laurentian mountains from Mont Tremblant, Quebec

In the photo below, you can see the edge of the Shield where it is cut off by the Ottawa River Valley, a great, wide valley which extends from the St. Lawrence River in the east and swings west and then northward towards Hudson Bay. It is a rift valley, formed when the bedrock dropped down tens of kilometres deep. Several major fault-lines run through the area and we experience frequent earth tremors, as a result.

View from the Champlain Lookout

View from the Champlain Lookout, in the Gatineau Hills

The edge of the Shield which bounds it on the northern edge rises up about 300 metres.

Parts of the Shield extend down into the US.

The Ottawa Valley and Canadian Shield

The Ottawa Valley and Canadian Shield

The Ottawa River Valley

The Ottawa River Valley

The Ottawa Valley was once part of the great Champlain Sea, a huge brackish inland sea where whales once swam. The Champlain Sea formed when the great ice sheets of the last ice age pressed down on the land and when the melted, the Atlantic Ocean flooded in. When the last of the ice was gone, the continent tipped back and the water flowed out, again.

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32 Comments

  1. funnyrunner said,

    July 20, 2009 at 10:13 pm

    really cool. My son, who is totally into science, would love this post! Thanks for visiting my blog!

  2. Annie said,

    July 20, 2009 at 3:55 pm

    Beautiful photos! I enjoyed this post. Have a great week.

  3. jmb said,

    July 20, 2009 at 9:50 am

    Amazing how that first photo of a rock turned into an art photo. Beautiful.

    Thanks for visiting and have a great week.

  4. July 20, 2009 at 4:24 am

    A wonderful entry in the theme. Thank you for sharing.

  5. Starnitesky said,

    July 20, 2009 at 1:50 am

    Thanks for the interesting Geology info, I studied Geology in UK and it is always interesting to find out about other countries. Beautiful photos as well, especially the first one.

  6. bookbabie said,

    July 19, 2009 at 6:38 pm

    Great history lesson and photos!

  7. kaye said,

    July 19, 2009 at 8:16 am

    thanks for your comments about rocks known as goblin’s when you visited my photo-hunt. Your history and photo’s were very interesting.

  8. Lorna said,

    July 19, 2009 at 8:13 am

    Your first photo looked like the place we ended up in when our car went off the road near Bancroft. The rest were beautiful, but not so personally scary.

    • mudhooks said,

      July 19, 2009 at 8:40 am

      Ohhh… Sorry about that. This rock is in along the edge of a parking area near the Lauriault Train in the Gatineau Park.. A very non-threatening rock and, judging from the lichen and moss on it, staying put.

  9. Kelly said,

    July 19, 2009 at 7:02 am

    Wow very impressive! It’s great to learn new things. Thanks for visiting.

  10. A. said,

    July 19, 2009 at 2:47 am

    A very interesting post, and lovely shots!

  11. lissa said,

    July 19, 2009 at 1:36 am

    what beauties…

  12. VioletSky said,

    July 19, 2009 at 12:57 am

    Love the colours in the first photo. And am heading up to Ottawa next weekend so will get to see some of that scenery for myself (I hope).

    • mudhooks said,

      July 19, 2009 at 5:40 am

      The weather has been somewhat iffy but the clouds are monumental. You would be sure to get some amazing photos from Champlain Lookout, for sure!

      Last night I was at Bluesfest at the Blacksheep Stage behind the new War Museum. The sunset was so amazing! Indescribable!

  13. sledpress said,

    July 18, 2009 at 11:31 pm

    Can I steal some of those photos, like for rotation on my desktop? Whoo.

  14. noggin said,

    July 18, 2009 at 9:58 pm

    Very interesting.

    Some of the photos are reminiscent of Wales, but on a totally different scale!

  15. azahar said,

    July 18, 2009 at 9:50 pm

    Wow, yours really is way bigger than mine!

  16. July 18, 2009 at 8:52 pm

    Very interesting post – and lovely, lovely photos.

  17. July 18, 2009 at 7:35 pm

    Upstate New York looks much like this, except we have fewer forests (except for the Adirondack Mountains) and more pastureland. Great post!

    My Photo Hunters is up, too. I hope you have a little time to visit. 🙂

    Mrs. Mecomber
    http://newyorktraveler.net

    Have a good weekend!

  18. Carver said,

    July 18, 2009 at 7:10 pm

    What a great post. Breathtaking shots and perfect for the theme.

  19. upto6only said,

    July 18, 2009 at 3:53 pm

    bautiful pictures of the rocks. nice landscapes also.

    mine is up

  20. July 18, 2009 at 3:37 pm

    Wow Thanks for the Geology lesson and some wonderful photos.I think you win the award for the oldest and largest rock in this week’s theme!Have a great weekend

  21. Gemma said,

    July 18, 2009 at 3:28 pm

    These are breathtaking images! I am totally fascinated! This is the first I knew about the Champlain Sea!

  22. Chris said,

    July 18, 2009 at 2:49 pm

    I like the lichens on the rock! My rock pic is up at http://riverbum.blogspot.com

  23. July 18, 2009 at 2:49 pm

    The colors in these series are breathtaking. Thanks for sharing and for stopping by.

    Have a great weekend!

  24. Jerry said,

    July 18, 2009 at 2:43 pm

    Great shot of the shield. Normally I would have posted lots of pics from the area – we camp there often (and chalet at Tremblant) but I went with rocks from our recent trip to Maine instead.

  25. Zoolatry said,

    July 18, 2009 at 2:28 pm

    Beautiful photos and very interesting write up; having vacationed often in The 1000 Islands as a child; and as an adult, skied in the Laurentians… today I learned things I never knew about the area… a wonderful post! Thanks!
    The Zoolatry Human, Ann

    • mudhooks said,

      July 19, 2009 at 5:37 am

      I once tried to ski down Mont Tremblant. In actual fact. I FELL down Mont Tremblant. It took me all day to do and I was sore for WEEKS after. It is so beautiful, though, in the winter. Well, it is beautiful all year long…

  26. julie said,

    July 18, 2009 at 2:15 pm

    I love it! I learned a lot today. Beautiful photos too 🙂

  27. HOOTIN' ANNI said,

    July 18, 2009 at 2:14 pm

    Absolutely amazing photos….and such great information for us all.

    My rocks are now posted. Won’t you try to stop by to view my photos today? Have a great weekend.

  28. bim said,

    July 18, 2009 at 1:45 pm

    I enjoyed your post a lot – really interesting and great photos, too 🙂

  29. RJ Flamingo said,

    July 18, 2009 at 1:44 pm

    What a beautiful series – each more striking than the next! Thanks for visiting me!


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