PhotoHunter: “Walking”

Because of an injury I got about 20 years ago when I fell off my bike, I can’t do a lot of walking. I get spasms in my back if I walk further than a block… and even less, sometimes.

I started to at the end of the winter but have been sidetracked, working to make up the hours I took off to leave early and come back late from London (Ontario) in order to see my friend Carol before she died.

I have to start up again.

When I walk, I spend a lot of time looking down. People have said that I need to “look up and see the world”. Hell, NO! Looking down helps me find money and odds and ends to use in my sculptures and artwork. Looking down allows me to see flowers and fauna I would have missed otherwise.

I decided to put in a few photos of things I have found while walking… and looking down.

"Three Little Angels"

"Three Little Angels"

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The little angels were found one by one in different locations, each one shortly after each of my miscarriages. The first, I found while walking along a street in New York City. I had just been looking at one in a store but decided they were too expensive. Later that day, I found one on the street. Like the others that were to follow, they had been trodden on and mangled and, in a way, that seemed appropriate.

Serendipity….

"Blood Root"

"Blood Root"

Almost hidden in the leaf litter on a late Spring day.

Found the same day….

Sharp-lobed Hepatica (Hepatica acutiloba)

Sharp-lobed Hepatica (Hepatica acutiloba)

and…

Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides)

Blue Cohosh (Caulophyllum thalictroides)

Of course, in times gone by, walking was the only way of getting around, on land at least. Located on the edge of Pinecrest Cemetery, in Nepean (where my father is buried), are the last remnants of an Indian trail which led from a long-used stopping point down the Ottawa River, on Britannia Bay (Lake Deschaines), to Black Rapids. There is a cairn to mark one end of it but you can easily see the trail up from what is now a busy city road, through the stand of trees and up the rise into what is now the cemetery. The few people who might wander up the well-worn trail, don’t even know that they are following a trail perhaps 200 or more years old.

"Indian Trail between Lake Deschaines and Black Rapids"

"Indian Trail between Lake Deschaines and Black Rapids"

Part of the trail

Part of the trail

Looking down one end of the trail to Baseline Road

Looking down one end of the trail to Baseline Road

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