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It is comforting to see officials do a thorough and lengthy investigation…

Jail staff cleared after N.S. man shot with Taser: officials

“Corrections officers followed proper procedures while Howard Hyde, the man who died a day after being jolted with a Taser by police, was in their custody, officials said Monday.”

….Hyde, 45, a paranoid schizophrenic, died Thursday morning at the Nova Scotia Correctional Facility in Dartmouth, 30 hours after police shocked him with a Taser to try to subdue him. The stun gun was used on Hyde at a police station where he was being booked on an assault charge.”

Today is Monday. The investigation was ordered Thursday afternoon.

The RCMP continue to investigate Hyde’s death.

Of course, the question of why someone suffering from Paranoid Schizophrenia was in jail and not in a mental health facility, I suppose, is silly.

It is comforting to see officials do a thorough and lengthy investigation…

Jail staff cleared after N.S. man shot with Taser: officials

“Corrections officers followed proper procedures while Howard Hyde, the man who died a day after being jolted with a Taser by police, was in their custody, officials said Monday.”

….Hyde, 45, a paranoid schizophrenic, died Thursday morning at the Nova Scotia Correctional Facility in Dartmouth, 30 hours after police shocked him with a Taser to try to subdue him. The stun gun was used on Hyde at a police station where he was being booked on an assault charge.”

Today is Monday. The investigation was ordered Thursday afternoon.

The RCMP continue to investigate Hyde’s death.

Of course, the question of why someone suffering from Paranoid Schizophrenia was in jail and not in a mental health facility, I suppose, is silly.

19 (at least) And Counting

“A 36-year-old British Columbia man has died in hospital more than four days after being subdued by RCMP officers with a Taser and nearly every other available weapon except firearms.” CBC (CDN)

In this case, I am willing to concede that the Taser might not have been the exact cause of death. I doubt it helped, though.

It seems that many of the Tasered people have had mental health issues. Police claim that they are “trained” to deal with people with mental health issues. However, given the number of people exhibiting signs of being in the midst of a psychiatric crisis who have been taken down by either a Taser or violent force (or both), it seems that their methods need reviewing.

It’s easy to pass the buck on this and blame the person who is, because of a mental health issue, becomes violent for their own misfortune, Many of these events could have been prevented with better crisis intervention for people with mental health problems, better monitoring, better management of Canada’s mental health system.

… and by extension, when the system fails, a better ability to recognise and respond appropriately to people in the middle of a crisis without it ending up with them ending up battered…. or dead.

We have SWAT teams in most cities, as well as hostage negotiators, and other specialty branches within most police forces. Surely to God, taking the extra two minutes to evaluate a situation and call in people trained properly to deal with the mentally ill would not be too much of a stretch, either in personal or in finances. Considering the cost of inquiring into every handling of a serious injury or death to someone who was clearly in crisis it seems to me a small price to pay to prevent rather than pick up the pieces afterwards.

Considering the fact that most of the recent deaths have involved people who were in crisis with either a long-standing mental health issue or some sort of mental health crisis, brought on by other circumstances, I think it is high time that consideration should be given to better train police and to reassess the mental health system.

19 (at least) And Counting

“A 36-year-old British Columbia man has died in hospital more than four days after being subdued by RCMP officers with a Taser and nearly every other available weapon except firearms.” CBC (CDN)

In this case, I am willing to concede that the Taser might not have been the exact cause of death. I doubt it helped, though.

It seems that many of the Tasered people have had mental health issues. Police claim that they are “trained” to deal with people with mental health issues. However, given the number of people exhibiting signs of being in the midst of a psychiatric crisis who have been taken down by either a Taser or violent force (or both), it seems that their methods need reviewing.

It’s easy to pass the buck on this and blame the person who is, because of a mental health issue, becomes violent for their own misfortune, Many of these events could have been prevented with better crisis intervention for people with mental health problems, better monitoring, better management of Canada’s mental health system.

… and by extension, when the system fails, a better ability to recognise and respond appropriately to people in the middle of a crisis without it ending up with them ending up battered…. or dead.

We have SWAT teams in most cities, as well as hostage negotiators, and other specialty branches within most police forces. Surely to God, taking the extra two minutes to evaluate a situation and call in people trained properly to deal with the mentally ill would not be too much of a stretch, either in personal or in finances. Considering the cost of inquiring into every handling of a serious injury or death to someone who was clearly in crisis it seems to me a small price to pay to prevent rather than pick up the pieces afterwards.

Considering the fact that most of the recent deaths have involved people who were in crisis with either a long-standing mental health issue or some sort of mental health crisis, brought on by other circumstances, I think it is high time that consideration should be given to better train police and to reassess the mental health system.

(At least) 18 and counting….

Nova Scotia’s Justice Minister has ordered a ministerial review of police use of Tasers after the death of a man in custody early Thursday. Globe and Mail (CDN)

Meanwhile:

“British Police have been given the go-ahead to use Taser stun guns against children. The relaxing of restrictions on the use of the weapons comes despite warnings that they could trigger a heart attack in youngsters.” Daily Mail (UK)

And:…
“RCMP in Manitoba are being sued by a former soldier with various mental disorders who says officers used a Taser on him while he was handcuffed.”
CBC (CDN)

This does not surprise me….

“Ontario’s top cop yesterday blasted critics who rush to judgment after police used Tasers in the death of a man at a Vancouver airport but remain mute when police officers are killed.

“I’m really concerned about the rhetoric swirling around out there that’s devoid of knowing all the facts,” OPP Commissioner Julian Fantino, a former London police chief, said in London.

“The people who are doing all the screaming have no idea what they’re talking about,” he said.” – London Free Press (CDN)

Gee, Could we possibly be screaming about things like this?

“The Utah Highway Patrol said the video, taken from Trooper John Gardner’s pa[t]rol car, showed him Tasering Jared Massey when he started walking away after refusing to sign the ticket, Associated Press reported..” (AUS) (you will note that the officer has his Taser out and aimed at the driver before he has reached for his handcuffs and at no time did he say “Stop, or I will Taser you” as he claims to the other officer. I don’t know about Utah, in Canada one doesn’t need to sign a ticket for it to be valid. One only signs it when one is contesting the ticket and sending it in to state one is going to go to court over it .)

(At least) 18 and counting….

Nova Scotia’s Justice Minister has ordered a ministerial review of police use of Tasers after the death of a man in custody early Thursday. Globe and Mail (CDN)

Meanwhile:

“British Police have been given the go-ahead to use Taser stun guns against children. The relaxing of restrictions on the use of the weapons comes despite warnings that they could trigger a heart attack in youngsters.” Daily Mail (UK)

And:…
“RCMP in Manitoba are being sued by a former soldier with various mental disorders who says officers used a Taser on him while he was handcuffed.”
CBC (CDN)

This does not surprise me….

“Ontario’s top cop yesterday blasted critics who rush to judgment after police used Tasers in the death of a man at a Vancouver airport but remain mute when police officers are killed.

“I’m really concerned about the rhetoric swirling around out there that’s devoid of knowing all the facts,” OPP Commissioner Julian Fantino, a former London police chief, said in London.

“The people who are doing all the screaming have no idea what they’re talking about,” he said.” – London Free Press (CDN)

Gee, Could we possibly be screaming about things like this?

“The Utah Highway Patrol said the video, taken from Trooper John Gardner’s pa[t]rol car, showed him Tasering Jared Massey when he started walking away after refusing to sign the ticket, Associated Press reported..” (AUS) (you will note that the officer has his Taser out and aimed at the driver before he has reached for his handcuffs and at no time did he say “Stop, or I will Taser you” as he claims to the other officer. I don’t know about Utah, in Canada one doesn’t need to sign a ticket for it to be valid. One only signs it when one is contesting the ticket and sending it in to state one is going to go to court over it .)

The Frank Paul Inquiry

The Government of British Columbia has appointed an independent commission of inquiry to examine the circumstances surrounding the death of Frank Joseph Paul. Mr. Paul, a Mi’kmaq from New Brunswick, was removed from the Vancouver Police Department lockup at about 8:30 p.m. on December 5, 1998, and was left in a nearby alley by a police officer. His body was found in the alley early the next morning. An autopsy concluded he had died from hypothermia due to exposure/alcohol intoxication.

The sole Commissioner, appointed under the Public Inquiry Act, is former B.C. Supreme Court Justice William H. Davies, Q.C.

Backgrounder From the Inquiry website:

At 8:18 p.m. on December 5, 1998 Frank Joseph Paul, a 47-year-old New Brunswick Mi’Kmaq First Nations man living in Vancouver, was arrested in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver by two Vancouver police officers for being intoxicated in a public place. He was transported to the Vancouver Police Department’s jail facility at 312 Main Street. Several minutes later he was removed from the lockup, placed into a police van, and left in an alleyway in East Vancouver. Mr. Paul’s body was found at the same location at 2:41 a.m. the following morning.

According to the autopsy report, death was attributed to hypothermia due to acute alcohol intoxication. The coroner decided against calling a Coroner’s Inquest, choosing instead to conduct an Inquiry without a jury under s. 20 of the Coroners Act, and issued a Judgment of Inquiry.

In 2000 the Vancouver Police Department concluded disciplinary proceedings against two officers. One officer was suspended for two days for discreditable conduct, and the other officer was suspended for one day for neglect of duty.

In January 2002 the Police Complaints Commissioner advised the Chief of the Vancouver Police Department that, in his view, a Public Hearing under the Police Act would not be the appropriate vehicle to address the issues arising from the death of Mr. Paul, and that he would be taking no further action. He subsequently wrote to the provincial Solicitor General, recommending an inquest and suggesting a province-wide review of police response to circumstances where they detain or release people who are unable to care for themselves.

In June 2003 the new Police Complaints Commissioner released to counsel acting for Mr. Paul’s family portions of the police jail surveillance video depicting Mr. Paul’s arrival and departure at the Vancouver Police jail on December 5, 1998. Based on new information concerning the circumstances of Mr. Paul’s removal from the jail hours before his death, the Police Complaints Commissioner re-opened the Frank Paul file. In January 2004 he published Reasons for Decision in which he recommended a full public inquiry.

On several occasions the Criminal Justice Branch of the Ministry of Attorney General examined the circumstances surrounding Mr. Paul’s death. In each review, the Branch decided not to proceed with criminal charges against any of the police officers involved.

On February 22, 2007 the Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General announced a public inquiry into the Frank Paul case. On March 9, 2007 he announced that William H. Davies, Q.C. would act as commissioner, and that the inquiry would be conducted under the proposed new Public Inquiry Act.

On August 10, 2007 the Attorney General published the public inquiry’s purpose and terms of reference. The Commission is to submit a final report to the Attorney General on or before May 31, 2008.

I will try to upload video of the testimony of his cousin, Peggy Clement. At this time, I cannot seem to upload it.

The Frank Paul Inquiry

The Government of British Columbia has appointed an independent commission of inquiry to examine the circumstances surrounding the death of Frank Joseph Paul. Mr. Paul, a Mi’kmaq from New Brunswick, was removed from the Vancouver Police Department lockup at about 8:30 p.m. on December 5, 1998, and was left in a nearby alley by a police officer. His body was found in the alley early the next morning. An autopsy concluded he had died from hypothermia due to exposure/alcohol intoxication.

The sole Commissioner, appointed under the Public Inquiry Act, is former B.C. Supreme Court Justice William H. Davies, Q.C.

Backgrounder From the Inquiry website:

At 8:18 p.m. on December 5, 1998 Frank Joseph Paul, a 47-year-old New Brunswick Mi’Kmaq First Nations man living in Vancouver, was arrested in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver by two Vancouver police officers for being intoxicated in a public place. He was transported to the Vancouver Police Department’s jail facility at 312 Main Street. Several minutes later he was removed from the lockup, placed into a police van, and left in an alleyway in East Vancouver. Mr. Paul’s body was found at the same location at 2:41 a.m. the following morning.

According to the autopsy report, death was attributed to hypothermia due to acute alcohol intoxication. The coroner decided against calling a Coroner’s Inquest, choosing instead to conduct an Inquiry without a jury under s. 20 of the Coroners Act, and issued a Judgment of Inquiry.

In 2000 the Vancouver Police Department concluded disciplinary proceedings against two officers. One officer was suspended for two days for discreditable conduct, and the other officer was suspended for one day for neglect of duty.

In January 2002 the Police Complaints Commissioner advised the Chief of the Vancouver Police Department that, in his view, a Public Hearing under the Police Act would not be the appropriate vehicle to address the issues arising from the death of Mr. Paul, and that he would be taking no further action. He subsequently wrote to the provincial Solicitor General, recommending an inquest and suggesting a province-wide review of police response to circumstances where they detain or release people who are unable to care for themselves.

In June 2003 the new Police Complaints Commissioner released to counsel acting for Mr. Paul’s family portions of the police jail surveillance video depicting Mr. Paul’s arrival and departure at the Vancouver Police jail on December 5, 1998. Based on new information concerning the circumstances of Mr. Paul’s removal from the jail hours before his death, the Police Complaints Commissioner re-opened the Frank Paul file. In January 2004 he published Reasons for Decision in which he recommended a full public inquiry.

On several occasions the Criminal Justice Branch of the Ministry of Attorney General examined the circumstances surrounding Mr. Paul’s death. In each review, the Branch decided not to proceed with criminal charges against any of the police officers involved.

On February 22, 2007 the Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General announced a public inquiry into the Frank Paul case. On March 9, 2007 he announced that William H. Davies, Q.C. would act as commissioner, and that the inquiry would be conducted under the proposed new Public Inquiry Act.

On August 10, 2007 the Attorney General published the public inquiry’s purpose and terms of reference. The Commission is to submit a final report to the Attorney General on or before May 31, 2008.

I will try to upload video of the testimony of his cousin, Peggy Clement. At this time, I cannot seem to upload it.

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