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"Capping" of sentences for those with mental illnesses caught in the criminal justice system

As a result of the high-profile criminal case involving Tony Rosato who was found guilty of criminal harassment of his wife, the court system is finally reviewing the “warehousing” of people who, for reasons of mental health, have been given open-ended sentences to mental health facilities.

Previously, lawyers have been reluctant to call for their clients to be declared not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder. In doing so their clients faced uncertain futures in mental health facilities, even when their conditions were treatable and, in fact, treated.

“Capping” the sentences would allow judges and the Parole Board to monitor the progress of those found guilty and to allow judges greater freedom in sentencing in such a way that they would get the treatment they needed.

“Several years ago, Parliament passed capping provisions that would limit the time an offender found not criminally responsible would spend in a mental hospital, but they were never proclaimed into law. At the close of the trial, Brodsky said the verdict sent a political signal to Ottawa that the capping provision should be revisited.

Brodsky, who is one of the founders of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted and who does half his practice in mental-health law, also said the ministry should set up provincewide, coordinated, regional, mental-health courts similar to the full-time dedicated one that exists in Toronto.

“The province itself isn’t regionalized, and it has to be,” says Brodsky.
The courts, in which Crowns and defence lawyers are specially trained in mental-health law work, should exist across the province so that future defendants don’t languish in a provincial lockup like Rosato, he says.

Currently, the only full-time court dedicated to mental-health issues is at Toronto’s Old City Hall. A handful of sporadic, part-time programs exist elsewhere, for example in Ottawa, but “the gaps between them are as large as the Grand Canyon,” he says.

“This is not a big cover-up or conspiracy case, it’s just a case that’s dragged on far too long,” he said.”

(read the full article)

"Capping" of sentences for those with mental illnesses caught in the criminal justice system

As a result of the high-profile criminal case involving Tony Rosato who was found guilty of criminal harassment of his wife, the court system is finally reviewing the “warehousing” of people who, for reasons of mental health, have been given open-ended sentences to mental health facilities.

Previously, lawyers have been reluctant to call for their clients to be declared not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder. In doing so their clients faced uncertain futures in mental health facilities, even when their conditions were treatable and, in fact, treated.

“Capping” the sentences would allow judges and the Parole Board to monitor the progress of those found guilty and to allow judges greater freedom in sentencing in such a way that they would get the treatment they needed.

“Several years ago, Parliament passed capping provisions that would limit the time an offender found not criminally responsible would spend in a mental hospital, but they were never proclaimed into law. At the close of the trial, Brodsky said the verdict sent a political signal to Ottawa that the capping provision should be revisited.

Brodsky, who is one of the founders of the Association in Defence of the Wrongly Convicted and who does half his practice in mental-health law, also said the ministry should set up provincewide, coordinated, regional, mental-health courts similar to the full-time dedicated one that exists in Toronto.

“The province itself isn’t regionalized, and it has to be,” says Brodsky.
The courts, in which Crowns and defence lawyers are specially trained in mental-health law work, should exist across the province so that future defendants don’t languish in a provincial lockup like Rosato, he says.

Currently, the only full-time court dedicated to mental-health issues is at Toronto’s Old City Hall. A handful of sporadic, part-time programs exist elsewhere, for example in Ottawa, but “the gaps between them are as large as the Grand Canyon,” he says.

“This is not a big cover-up or conspiracy case, it’s just a case that’s dragged on far too long,” he said.”

(read the full article)

Heidi Conrod, artist

Heidi Conrod, artist

“Roll Over Beethoven”. This 1961 cover by The Velaires is the most popular cover of the song, ever. more… The Velaires scored a top ten hit nationally with this release on the Jamie record label (the song posted at #1 in the Los Angeles area, according to Billboard Magazine.) Appearances on American Bandstand and national tours with Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars followed, as well as many subsequent releases on eight different labels. The Velaires were inducted into the Iowa Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.

Velaires founder and lead guitar, Danny Matousek, was my cousin.

Some photos taken on a trip along the Quebec sideof the Ottawa River

The Boy That Nobody Liked….

… still cries out for attention…

Mulroney still blames everyone else for his failures and still can’t understand why nobody likes him.

“Citizens tend to expect in their leaders a certain cool, self-possessed decorum. Pierre Trudeau had that quality, Mulroney didn’t. There were many reasons for Mulroney to envy Trudeau, but this may have been the most compelling.

In Memoirs he comes across as something of a whiner, a politician who loses his poise when dealing with failure or betrayal. His anger is too overt, his neediness too obvious, just as when he was in office. Serenity under pressure was a quality he admired but could never emulate.” Robert Fulford, National Post (Read the full article)

“Roll Over Beethoven”. This 1961 cover by The Velaires is the most popular cover of the song, ever. more… The Velaires scored a top ten hit nationally with this release on the Jamie record label (the song posted at #1 in the Los Angeles area, according to Billboard Magazine.) Appearances on American Bandstand and national tours with Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars followed, as well as many subsequent releases on eight different labels. The Velaires were inducted into the Iowa Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.

Velaires founder and lead guitar, Danny Matousek, was my cousin.

Some photos taken on a trip along the Quebec sideof the Ottawa River

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